Shoulder Surgery: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

To repair some of the damage done when I wiped out on that wet tile floor, I’ve had two shoulder surgeries – performed by two different surgeons.

The first surgery was to repair my severed labrum.  This injury is more commonly known as a SLAP tear.  SLAP is an acronym for Superior Labrum Anterior and Posterior.  The labrum is a ring of cartilage that surrounds the socket of the shoulder joint.  It helps to deepen the shoulder socket and to stabilize the shoulder, and is the attachment point for many of the shoulder’s ligaments and one of the biceps tendons.

Torn labrums are ridiculously painful.  Before I was successful in convincing  my PCM that I needed a shoulder MRI, I was taking strong drugs and begging for a referral to pain management.

My first shoulder surgery was also my first ever surgery – if you don’t count having my wisdom teeth out years ago.  It was pretty straightforward.  My labrum was severed; the surgeon went in and reattached it.  He used a couple of plastic anchor bolts and some sutures to reattach the labrum.  He cut away a little dead tissue, and made sure there was no other damage that had not been detected by the MRI/arthrogram.

Prior to the surgery, I had been in a ridiculous amount of pain.  I was able to sleep in one position on the couch – lying on my non-injured side, with my back against the back of the couch, and surrounded by 5-6 pillows that held my shoulder in the one position in which the pain mostly subsided and I could fall asleep.  Of course, anytime I moved in my sleep and the shoulder shifted, the pain woke me up.

Post-surgery was worse.  I didn’t get the memo that the best way to recover from shoulder surgery is to sleep in a recliner.  We did not *have* a recliner.  Had I known, I would have begged, borrowed, or bought a recliner.

Seriously, if you’re going to have shoulder surgery, make sure you can convalesce in a recliner – or an adjustable bed.

I came home from out-patient shoulder surgery narc’d to the gills (technical term) ;-).  Typically, for shoulder surgeries the anesthesiologist will do a nerve block, which blocks the nerve signals for up to 24 hours.  I was also placed under general anesthesia for the surgery.  And the nurses often will give you a narcotic before you leave post-op, to make sure you “stay ahead” of the pain.

So Spousal Unit got me back into the house and ensconced on the couch.  I got “comfortable” sitting sideways on the couch, with my newly repaired shoulder in a sling that was resting on multiple pillows and leaning against the back of the couch.  I dosed most of the rest of the day, and slept sitting up for the first few nights.  (Not comfortable.  Do not recommend.  You need to be exhausted to do it.]

I had a long and painful recovery.  My labrum hurt significantly LESS after surgery, but it still hurt like hell.  You have to keep your shoulder immobile for a long time to allow the labrum to heal, and that creates other problems, as your shoulder and elbow can get painfully stiff.

Flash forward two years, to shoulder surgery #2:

The shoulder felt “good as new” for about a year and a half.  And then it didn’t.  First the motion felt “off.”  The shoulder started to catch and clunk.  Then the pain started to return.

By this time, we had moved to another state, and I had a different orthopedic surgeon, who had already operated on my wrist and elbow.  After the manual examination and the MRI/arthrogram, he told me he would operate, but he wasn’t going to repair my re-torn labrum.

In fact, he told me that if he had performed my first shoulder surgery, he wouldn’t have repaired my severed labrum.

“Okay, doc, you HAVE my attention.  Please explain to me why you would not have repaired something that was totally severed and causing excruciating pain, because that sounds totally counterintuitive to me.”

We then proceeded to have a long conversation about labral tears.  And age.  In a nutshell, my ortho explained that labral injuries do not heal well in patients over 40.  Based on his experience and knowledge of the literature, he thought it was a waste of time to repair the labrum again.  Instead, he wanted to severe my (perfectly functional and not damaged in any way) biceps tendon from the labrum and reattach it to my humerus in a procedure called a “biceps tenodesis.”

The reason for this is that the biceps tendon is connected to the labrum, and the tension it exerts on the labrum can prevent the tear from healing and can actually make the tear worse.  By removing this tension, you create the possibility that the labrum might heal itself.  But even if it doesn’t heal, because you removed the stress on the labrum, hopefully the tear won’t continue to get larger.

My surgeon recommended I read a couple medical journal articles on the subject (because he knows I always thoroughly research my medical issues and the procedures doctors recommend to treat them), and then we would meet again to discuss the surgical options.

Here are some of the articles I read to inform my decision about revision [repeat] shoulder surgery:

Controversy persists about whether to repair SLAP tears in patients over 40 years with associated rotator cuff tears (RTC).”

Torn rotator cuff with SLAP tear

The efficacy of biceps tenodesis in the treatment of failed superior labral anterior posterior repairs

“The cumulative evidence supports labral debridement or biceps tenotomy over labral repair when an associated rotator cuff injury is present.”

Subpectoral biceps tenodesis for the treatment of type II and IV superior labral anterior and posterior lesions.

Glenohumeral ligaments

Superior labrum anterior posterior (SLAP) tears

Rotator cuff injury

There’s a good quick-and-dirty summary of the research here, which answers the question: “Why would you fix my biceps if my labrum is torn?” It also provides a good explanation of the procedure and has an illustration.

The research supported what my ortho had said.  In fact, in recent studies labral tears were shown not to heal well in patients older than 26.  26!  In addition to the SLAP tear, the arthrogram had shown a small rotator cuff injury, and the research on that injury recommended repairing the rotator cuff, doing a biceps tenodesis, and leaving the torn labrum alone.

Had this been my first experience with this surgeon, my decision might have been more difficult.  But, based on the research, and based on my previous (all excellent) experiences with this surgeon , I decided to trust him to fix my SLAP tear by ignoring the labrum and jiggering with my biceps tendon.

I felt really uncomfortable letting him cut something that wasn’t broken to begin with.  In the end, you do your research, make the best decision you can, and trust your surgeon (whom you have carefully researched and selected) to do a good job.

Fortunately, when he got inside my shoulder, he found no evidence of rotator cuff damage, so he inspected it thoroughly and left it alone.  Had I needed rotator cuff repair, my recovery would have been much longer.

I was a lot smarter the second time around.  I had a recliner AND an adjustable bed.  Never even needed the recliner – the adjustable bed worked just great!  I was able to raise the head to get enough support for the shoulder, but still be able to sleep.  I still propped up the arm on several pillows, but got much better quality of sleep than the first time around.

But here was the absolute game-changer: a chiller (aka cold therapy).  Now, faithful readers of this blog will know that I seldom endorse any product.  But a post-surgery chiller is something I HIGHLY recommend.

I don’t know how I didn’t know about them before, but these devices circulate ice water over the site of your injury/surgery.  This helps prevent inflammation, and also brings pain relief.  Chillers are particularly useful for joint surgeries (shoulders, knees, ankles, etc.)

I was offered the use of a chiller by some folks at church, because Tricare would not provide one.  [Possibly because my surgery was through a civilian provider.  I have recently seen military facilities loan them to patients post-surgery.]  They come in various sizes.  I was loaned a pretty basic one (see image), but it worked just great.

I understand that the folks I borrowed it from keep an eye open at thrift stores, yard sales, etc., and pick them up pretty cheaply.  Then they have one when they need it, and one or two to loan out.  It certainly made my recovery quicker and much less painful, and I am grateful.

[For the curious: Yes, it’s basically a small ice chest, but it has a pump and hoses that circulate ice water around the injury.  At the end of the hose is a plastic pad (see image) that you wrap around the injured site.  You can secure it with an included velcro flex strap (like an ace bandage).  All you have to do is add ice and water and plug it in.  BE CAREFUL TO AVOID COLD INJURIES.  Don’t ice for more than 20 minutes at a time, remove if it’s uncomfortable, and always place something between the pad and your skin (a hand towel, washcloth, pillow case, etc.).  ]

Why I am in love with cold therapy: After my first shoulder surgery, I was prescribed narcotics – “Take 1-2 pills every 4-6 hours, as needed.”  They wore off after TWO hours, and the pain was overwhelming.  I was living from dose to dose, just trying to hang on.  After my *second* shoulder surgery, I was given the same prescription, but I also used cold therapy.  I took 3 pills TOTAL.  And the second and third were only because the staff had given me multiple warnings about staying ahead of the pain, and I knew from previous experience that I did NOT want the pain to get ahead of ME.  I didn’t think I needed the narcotics, but was afraid to rely on the machine for pain control.  But as I increased the interval between pills, taking them only one at a time, and found that I was able to control the pain with cold therapy, I stopped taking them.  (The other great thing about that is, if you’re not taking narcotics, you don’t get opioid-induced constipation.)

Was the first surgeon wrong?  He repaired the damage, did a pretty good job, and it worked great for about 18 months.  He did no further damage, scarring was almost non-existent, there were no complications, and he didn’t overlook or fail to repair anything else.  My biggest complaints would be that 1) he did a repair that the research clearly shows to have a high failure rate in patients my age.  So I question how current he is in his knowledge of the literature in his field.  And 2) I did not have to suffer as much as I did post-surgery.  I really wish he’d told me about the chiller and the benefits of recovering in a recliner.

Had I seen my second orthopedic surgeon first, I probably would not have needed the second shoulder surgery.

Bottom line: The first orthopedic surgeon was adequate, but probably not as knowledgeable as he should have been.  There is a world of difference between surgeons, even between an *average* surgeon and an *excellent* one.

The Good: Cold Therapy/Chiller.  Adjustable bed/recliner.  An expert surgeon.

The Bad:  Needing revision (repeat) surgery.

The Ugly: The excruciating pain after my first shoulder surgery.  Sleeping sitting up on the couch.  Trying to take a shower after surgery (once cleared by the surgeon).

I did a lot of research before my first shoulder surgery.  I avoided a truly horrible surgeon, and selected one based on research and recommendations.  There was still a lot I didn’t know I didn’t know.  

Stay tuned for blog posts on how to select a specialist, such as a surgeon.  Knowledge is power.

 

2018 New Year’s Resolutions

I’m not making any this year.  I’m not tempting fate.

I’d love to resolve not to have any surgeries this year, but we all know how *that* went last year.

So, if you’re planning on making New Year’s resolutions this year, I recommend this post by J. D. Roth about goal setting that leads to greater chances of success.

Wishing you a healthy 2018!

Eliminate BS: Holiday Card Edition

As a military family, we love Christmas cards [and Hanukkah cards, and Kwanzaa cards, and Festivus – whatever you want to send us!]  We have friends and family slung all over the globe, and it’s a great way to keep in touch.  We get pictures and letters and cards updating us on the events of our tribe’s lives.  [Even got a spreadsheet last year!]

Plus, once a year you have a great incentive to make sure you have the correct address for your nomadic acquaintances.

But, you know, what with all the *other* holiday activities, sometimes our cards didn’t get sent until the next summer – if at all.  When my health declined, the cards did not get sent for several years.  [Which means, if you’re not diligent, you start to lose touch with people who have moved, possibly several times, in the interim.]

So last year (2016), we were inspired by Mrs. Frugalwood’s example to send Christmas postcards.  Great idea!  Less time, less money, less effort.  We ordered and sent personalized postcards, with a custom photo, in December, and kept in touch with everyone.  Huzzah!

However.  This year (2017) things did not go as smoothly.

  • Write and design personalized Christmas postcards?  Check.
  • Upload custom photo for postcards?  Check.
  • Use Cyber Monday discount to get a good price?  Check.
  • Buy postcard stamps?  Check.
  • Receive postcards promptly?  Check
  • Review postcards to ensure no errors?  Check.
  • Sit down to address the cards and have allergic reaction to the ink that prevented completing the task?  Check.

Wait.  Say again?

Yup, you heard me correctly.  This year I had an allergic reaction to the postcards.  Same company as last year.  Don’t know why, except that I have become increasingly more sensitive to odors and fragrances ever since that “unfortunate incident” at the VA.  All I know is when I took the postcards back out of the package to address them, the smell was overwhelming.  I sat near one of our air purifiers and tried to get them done, but by the time I’d addressed 20 postcards I had a raging headache, couldn’t stop coughing and clearing my throat, had itchy, watery eyes, and was starting to itch on all of my exposed skin.  Time to abort this mission.

Spousal Unit will probably finish addressing the cards (most likely using computer printed address labels, thus limiting exposure to the cards), although they will definitely be late this year.

And then it looks like we’ll transition to e-mailed holidays greetings next year.  Even less expensive, although taking the same amount of time to write the message.  Better for the planet too.

A bit less fun than cards that can sit on the mantel (or wherever you display them) or pictures you can put on your fridge or bulletin board.

But a better option than being taken out of action for a day (or two, or three).

Bottom Line: Are the holidays stressing you out?  Costing too much?  Making you ill?  Eliminate the B.S.!  

Find ways to reduce stress, expenses, and, especially, expectations.  That might be sending postcards instead of traditional greeting cards.  It might be emailing photos and greetings instead of mailing them.  Or you might decide to call or video message or Skype/Facetime/etc. a few close friends and family instead.

Don’t lose sight of the big picture: celebrating your family’s holy days (if applicable), maintaining and sustaining relationships, and living a healthy, sustainable (in every sense of the word) lifestyle.

Most of the over-the-top Pinterest-y type stuff you see on the internet is just another way for the advertisers to part you from more of your money.  You don’t have to be a Grinch, but don’t be a chump either.

Decide, along with your significant other, what makes you happy at the holidays.  (Maybe give the kids a vote, maybe not.)  Examine why you do all the things you do: Tradition?  “We’ve always done it that way?”  The neighbors are doing it, so we have to compete/keep up?  Figure out what is essential to your health and happiness, and do only that.  As for the rest?

Take a deep breath, relax, and eliminate. 😉

Happy Holidays from Crew Dog & the gang at One Sick Vet.

Health Hack: Bringing Back The Bandana

Time was, most men carried a bandana or a handkerchief (depending on whether they were country folk or city folk).  Most women carried handkerchiefs too.  But, somewhere along the way, cloth handkerchiefs fell out of favor and were replaced by disposable paper ones.  However, I have decided that what my life was missing was a bandana, and I have decided to bring them back.

The idea began, as many good ideas do, over lunch.  

While researching safety razors, I had discovered a new (to me) Zero Waste blog: Kathryn’s blog, “Going Zero Waste.”  After noodling around on her blog a bit, I had gone to the archives and started reading my way through her posts chronologically.

[I have been reading Zero Waste blogs for some time, beginning with the woman who started the genre: Bea Johnson and her blog “Zero Waste Home.”  Ideally, I aspire to create less and less waste until I would approach zero waste.  However, my ability to live a zero waste lifestyle tends to wax and wane depending upon my health.]

Newly reinvigorated by Kathryn’s example and enthusiasm, I set out to do my grocery shopping armed with my zero waste shopping kit and my Kleen Kanteen full of drinking water.  Having completed my shopping, I decided to eat out at a restaurant that uses real plates.  Since I had my own water bottle, I was able to avoid the plastic disposable cup with plastic disposable straw in a paper disposable wrapper.  In fact, my entire lunch was waste free except for the sandwich toothpicks (with frilly plastic decorative ends) – and the paper napkin.

Suddenly, I was determined to stop wasting paper napkins.  I remembered Kathryn saying in her blog that she carries reusable straws, cloth napkins, etc. in her bag, but I’m not ready to start carrying a pic-i-nic basket with me everywhere I go.  And most cloth napkins are pretty bulky to be carrying around in one’s pocket, just in case.  So I pondered…and pondered…

And then I had a flash of inspiration: Bandanas!  Large but thin, and *made* to be carried around in a pocket.  Not only could I easily carry a bandana around with me, but it’s also multipurpose.  A bandana can be a handkerchief, a napkin (not necessarily in that order), a dust mask, a head band, or even a make-shift tourniquet.  *And* I could wrap up the remains of a sandwich or a generous helping of potato chips in a bandana as well, thus avoiding a disposable food carton.  (Anyone else remember learning how to make a hobo sack on a stick in scouting?)

I am well pleased with my elegant (in the engineering sense of the word) solution.  Bandanas are lightweight and multipurpose.  I have selected some that are 100% cotton (beware! some are made of polyester these days), and intend to use them to replace disposable products such as tissue paper and paper napkins, thus saving the planet and my bank account.

There are a variety of designs, including traditional cowboy paisley, and several sizes.  I have selected a traditional 22″ x 22″ size, although you can also get them in 27″ square.  If you shop around a little bit, you can buy a bandana for less than $1.  I call that a pretty good deal.

Why is this a health hack?  1. Less garbage.  2.  Most disposable paper products are made using toxic chemicals, including bleach.  3.  More money to spend on healthy food, healthy products, or to invest in a healthy savings/investment account.  Financial security is very good for your health!  4.  You never know when you might need an emergency tourniquet…

In fact, here’s an entire blog post on survival uses for a bandana.  Awesome!

Now go and buy yourself a bandana – Tell ’em Crew Dog sent you. 😉  Might even still be time to grab some as stocking stuffers…  Heck, maybe we’ll start a stampede.

Health Hack: Using a DE (Double Edge) Safety Razor

Some things in life are intimidating when you first attempt them – like jumping out of an airplane, getting Botox injections, or using a safety razor.

Backstory: I started using a cartridge razor (the kind with the disposable heads [cartridges] but permanent handle) decades ago.  I was thoroughly, completely, and in every other way satisfied with my razor.  And then disaster struck.  

I dropped my razor one time too many, and a tiny plastic piece broke off – a piece which, it turns out, was critical to keeping the cartridge heads in place.  I tried to keep using my trusty razor, but the head kept coming off while I was shaving – not ideal, to say the least.

Since I had a significant cache of cartridges (bought on sale at the BX/PX), and I had always been happy with my razor, my first thought was to buy a replacement handle.  No joy.

It turns out that those handles are no longer being manufactured.  Furthermore, I could not find one on Amazon, eBay, or anywhere else on the internet.  In fact, I discovered that replacing that particular handle was a  Holy Grail quest.

My search led me to shaving forums – oh, yes, there are multiple forums online, on which shaving enthusiasts debate the relative merits of cartridge razors vs. safety razors, various shaving brushes, shaving soaps/foams, and even razor blades.  It turns out, my cartridge razor, unbeknownst to me, is considered one of the last good ones, before the handles became all plastic, and the cartridges kept sprouting more and more and more blades.

People from all over the world were searching for replacement handles for my razor, but the lucky few who had found them were not parting with them.  Even individuals who nearly exclusively shave with safety razors or even straight razors clung to their [brand name] cartridge razors for travel, or just nostalgia.

Having failed to procure a replacement handle for the world’s best cartridge razor, I turned to Plan B.  Although cartridge razors generate less garbage than plastic disposable razors, the cartridges are still thrown away after use.  But safety razors only generate used steel razor blades, which can be recycled (please use a blade bank or a tin can to safely house the blades when you recycle them – don’t cut some poor unsuspecting person or animal who encounters your used blades to shreds!)

I had long been thinking that if anything ever happened to the world’s best cartridge razor, I would switch to a safety razor.  Many people who are trying to reduce the amount of garbage they generate and the impact they have on the planet have switched to them – safety razors are typically all metal, and generate no plastic waste at all.

The process of selecting a safety razor to purchase was arduous – I read blog posts, search engine results, and many, many, shaving forum discussions.  I did not find a safety razor with the same handle length as the best cartridge razor in the world.  My cartridge razor is 5 inches from the top of the cartridge head to the end of the handle, and has always felt very good in my hand.  I could not find any safety razor this long.  The best I could find was 4 1/8 inches from the top to the end of the handle.

Having selected the razorI then needed to select blades.  I learned that quality razor blades are made in many countries: Sweden, Germany, Egypt, Russia, Israel – even the U.S.  According to the forums, some brands of razor blade are “more aggressive” than others.  This is important if you have sensitive skin or if you are a beginner.

One of the significant differences between cartridge razors and safety razors is that the head of a cartridge razor swivels to maintain a fairly constant angle between the blade(s) and your skin.  Safety razors, on the other hand, hold the blade in a fixed position, and the human must adjust the blade angle manually in response to the changing contours of the surface being shaved.  Fortunately, since humans have wrists, this is fairly easy to do.

However, there can be a bit of a learning curve during the transition from cartridge razors to safety razors.  Therefore, the forums recommended beginning with a “milder” or “less aggressive” blade.  I narrowed my list of possible blades down to two, and ultimately ordered the brand that could be delivered to me on the same day as the new razor.

The initial shave: It is a bit intimidating to unwrap the double-edged razor blade and place it in the razor.  Especially if, like me, you only saw videos of safety razors with butterfly clasps, but the razor you purchased doesn’t open that way.

Unable to “open” my razor to insert the razor blade, despite my best efforts, I turned to Google, and eventually discovered how to work my razor (the entire head screws off, then it comes apart in two pieces, you insert the blade between the two places, sandwich them together, and screw it back on the handle – carefully).

Having watched several tutorials, I gave it a go, using the same old soap I always use.  I was pleasantly surprised to discover how easy it was.  The intimidation was for nothing – the hair disappeared easily, with fewer strokes than I was used to making, and I didn’t nick myself at all.  Although I started out slowly, I soon was shaving with my normal speed.

Although there were a few moments when I missed the handle length of my old trusty cartridge razor, overall I was very pleased with my new safety razor.  I’d call it a successful experiment that will lead to a lifestyle change and less plastic in the landfill (and everywhere else plastic migrates).

Why is this a health hack?  1. No plastic.  2.  No garbage.  3. Many people report less razor burn and fewer ingrown hairs with the use of a safety razor.  4.  Less expensive – so you can spend your money on quality food, exercise, or other healthy things (or invest it in a retirement fund).

Intimidated by the thought of trying a safety razor?  Here’s a tutorial for men:

And here’s one for women.  (There’s an article and an imbedded video at this link.)

Have you tried a safety razor?  Why or why not?

 

How My Illness Has Made Me Like a (Stereotypical) Millennial

My entire life has changed as a result of having a chronic disabling health condition.  Here are some of the ways I’ve become like a stereotypical Millennial as a result:

  • I wait until the last minute to make plans (though not because I’m waiting to see if something better comes along – it’s because I don’t know if I’ll be healthy enough to participate).
  • I communicate with friends and family mostly through texts and social media (because I can do it on my terms, as my energy levels allow).
  • I have limited face-to-face communication (I’m allergic to fragrances, and seldom leave the house).
  • I do most of my shopping through Amazon Prime (due to that whole “seldom leaving the house” thing).
  • Netflix-and-chill binge-watching is how I spend entire days/weeks during a flare up of my symptoms.
  • I blog about my problems/experiences. 🙂
  • I use social media to find good restaurants (ones that make allergy-friendly meals).
  • I’m constantly looking for work, but currently unemployed.
  • Expressing myself with wild hair
  • Disillusionment with authority/experts – in my case, medical ones
  • It’s all about my smart phone (which is set with multiple alarms to remind me to take my various meds – from the time I wake up until the time I go to sleep).
  • I speak Internet: memes, music clips, video clips, gifs, pictures & emoticons all make communication richer.
  • I see tiny/minimalist/simple living as a way to live life on my own terms (those terms having been dictated to me by my illness).
  • I think technology is very useful (and hopes it brings the solution to my health problems).

To read more about Millennial research, see here.

To see how Millennial you are, take this quiz.

According to the quiz, I am 76% Millennial, while a typical Gen X’er is only 33% Millennial.  If I had a piercing or a tatt, I would have scored even higher.  (I intended to get my first tattoo this year, but, you guessed it, allergic!)  Having a tattoo would have made me 84% Millennial.

How has living with a chronic disabling illness or injury changed you?  How Millennial are you (and why/why not)?

If It’s Monday, the Air Force Must Be Threatening Legal Action

When I first fell and injured my arm, I went to my local military treatment facility for care.  As part of the paperwork, I reported that the injury was due to a slip-and-fall.  The paperwork seemed to indicate that since the injury occurred outside the U.S, the government would not pursue compensation from the resort.  I heard nothing further for three years.

No news is not good news, in the legal world.

After my fourth surgery to repair the damage from that fall, I again received paperwork from the government.  They stated that they were withholding payment to my surgeon until I completed the same form I had originally completed, detailing how and where the injury occurred.  Thinking this was odd, since I had already completed the paperwork over three years ago, I nevertheless completed the form again, and sent it in.  Again, I assumed that would be the end of the matter.

You know what they say about assuming things…

In addition to letters from the surgeon’s office inquiring as why my bill has not been paid, I have now received a letter from the Air Force Legal Operations Agency (AFLOA) threatening legal action against me, and suggesting that I should possibly retain my own lawyer.  In addition to the previous DD Form 2527 that I submitted, AFLOA is demanding I also submit “the attached MCRP Questionnaire…within 30 days.”  There are also threats of notification of First Sergeant or Commander if I am still active duty and do not return the form within 30 days.

So now, in addition to dealing with rehabilitation of the arm, beginning physical therapy for the knees, and pursuing diagnosis of the chronic, debilitating disorder from which I suffer, I need to defend myself against legal action from the Air Force because they do not want to pay for the health benefits Spousal Unit and I earned in active duty service to our country.

When the accident occurred, I remember being grateful that I had excellent medical coverage.  After the malpractice that occurred in the military’s treatment of my arm, and the current threatened legal action in an attempt not to pay for my treatment, I no longer consider my medical coverage excellent.

The deterioration of medical coverage for veterans, currently serving military members, and their families is a breach of contracts, both actual and psychological, that the government agreed to with members of the armed forces, in exchange for their selfless service.  We were promised full healthcare coverage for life.  Those benefits were earned through blood, sweat, and tears.  But they are being eroded.  The government is not living up to their end of the agreement.

Threatening to sue veterans because their treatment has become too expensive is disgraceful.  No veteran, service member, or family member should have to add the anxiety of threatened legal action (by the branch of service in which they selflessly served) to the burden of being sick or injured.  No veteran, service member, or family member should have to worry that their health benefits will be denied, or that their assets will be taken from them.

Does anyone know a lawyer with expertise in this area?  Apparently I have to defend myself against the Air Force.  Apparently the greatest fight of my life will not be in defense OF my country, but in defense FROM my country.  May God help us all.

Status Report 22 Sep 2017

Just a quick update today.  Hopefully more detailed post to follow.

The latest shoulder surgery seems to have gone very well.  Range of motion recovery is 3 months ahead of schedule, according to the orthopedic surgeon.  There is soreness during and after physical therapy, but the pain is gone.  The scars are also healing very nicely.  I am hopeful that this will have been the last surgery on this arm.  (The fourth time is the charm?)

Meanwhile, my knees have been getting worse.  (I know I haven’t talked about them on the blog before.)  Due to the drama with the arm, I had been not paying much attention to the fact that I was becoming less able to take short walks and climb up stairs.  But a friend came to visit recently, and my knees were hurting so much on a short walk we took that we had to seriously reduce our pace.  And this time, the effects lasted for at least a week.  Oh, and the stairs – I was hobbling up the stairs at home for at least a week, and some days I would just stay on one floor of the house to avoid the stairs.

Fortunately, I had a (very difficult to get) appointment with the VA not long after that.  My provider ordered x-rays and physical therapy for my knees, after diagnosing me with pes anserine bursitis upon physical exam.  And by physical exam, I mean she poked and prodded and twisted my knees until I was excitedly saying “Yes, it hurts when you push right there!” and “My leg doesn’t *go* that direction!”

The x-rays have been read, and the report confirms arthritis in both knees as well.  I already had a diagnosis of osteoarthritis from my VA intake exam, but had not been offered any treatment previously.  But my knees have deteriorated since then, and I welcome the chance to treat these aching knees.

More to follow soon, I hope, about ways to deal with arthritic knees.  Two steps forward, one step back.

 

Love Is…Green Slime

My diet (and my life) have gotten complicated.  I hope to write more about that soon.  Basically, I have been having allergic-type reactions to many foods I have previously been able to eat, and my diet is very restricted right now.

To go along with that, I have a complicated medicine routine.  My newest medicine has to be taken 4 times a day, on an empty stomach.  So I have a schedule of medications that begins when I wake up and goes throughout the day until I go to sleep, and requires me to deconflict one of my medicines from all the other medicines (and food), and requires that I take the new medication on an empty stomach (no food from 2 hours prior to 30 minutes after).  Yeah…

So I wake up, take the empty stomach med, wait 30 minutes, take another med, and eat breakfast, so that 1 hour later I can take my next med.  Did I mention I’m not a morning person, and don’t function very well when I first wake up?

The LAST thing I feel like doing half an hour after waking up is hassling with breakfast.

I used to eat several hours after waking up, when I had the capacity to deal with making food.  But now when I eat is dictated by my medicine schedule.  And what I eat is dictated by my allergic-type reactions.

Currently, I am having a drink for breakfast that we jokingly call “Green Slime.”  (You would probably call it green juice, or a green smoothie.)  We call it green slime because it looks like duckweed:

The recipe comes from one of the low histamine chef Yasmina Ykelenstam‘s cookbooks – she calls it green lemonade, although the recipe includes no lemons.  It’s mostly green vegetables, with apples as sweetener.  I also add chia seeds, for fiber and protein.

We first tried making green slime in the blender.  It’s do-able, but I don’t recommend it – for 2 reasons.  First, it’s hard on the blender motor.  Second, the consistency is like applesauce, which can be unpleasant to drink if you’re squeamish about textures.

Having determined that I liked green slime in theory, and would likely be drinking more juices, we bought a juicer.  I prefer a minimalist kitchen, and try not to buy extraneous kitchen tools, but this has proven to be a very useful device.  [And the slime is now a juice consistency, rather than an applesauce one.]  But I digress…

Because of my health condition, I need to eat very fresh foods.  So I can’t make green slime the night before and leave it in the fridge overnight.  Thus, every morning, veggies and fruit need to be chopped and processed through the juicer.  Working a knife within 1/2 hour of waking is not a good idea when you’re as out-of-it as I am in the morning.

It is highly probable that, left to my own devices, I would starve or die of malnourishment.

Fortunately for me, I am not left to my own devices.  Spousal Unit wakes up hours earlier than I do (for reasons that are completely inexplicable to me), and is gracious enough to prepare green slime for me every morning, even though Spousal Unit does not drink slime.

Each morning I take my first medicine, wait 30 minutes, take my second medicine, and then stagger out to the kitchen.  I open the refrigerator door and find a glass of green slime waiting for me.

Which means that Spousal Unit has cut up the fruit and veg, fed it through the juicer, poured the green slime into a glass, added chia seeds, stirred, and left the juice for me – every morning.

And all I have to do is drink it.  And then take my next medicine an hour later.  Totally do-able (most days).

And this is why I say “love is green slime.”  Thank you, Spousal Unit!