Breaking My New Year’s Resolution: There WILL be surgery in 2017

The plane in this photo is ground looping.  A ground loop can happen when a plane rotates horizontally (slides) while on the ground.  Ground loops can damage the landing gear, underside, and wings of an aircraft.  If a wingtip digs into the ground, the plane can even cartwheel.

Having ground looped my body three years ago by slipping on a wet tile floor and catching a wing (left arm) violently, I find that I am still not fully repaired.

I had hoped that the elbow surgery would be the last required repair.  However, we did not see the results we had hoped for.  The elbow surgery was a success, but I still had symptoms.  Distressingly, the shoulder (which was the first item repaired) was clunking again, and beginning to hurt.  It no longer functioned normally.

After failing physical therapy again, and undergoing an arthroscopy and MRI for said shoulder again, I learned that the first surgery (in the words of my current orthopedic surgeon) had “failed.”  The labrum showed a recurrent tear.

My surgeon informed me that he would not have performed the first repair in the manner in which my previous surgeon did, because I was “too old” for the surgery to be successful.  I might have thought about being offended at the age remark, but my surgeon is just a year or two younger than I am.  However, I was a bit irked that my first surgeon apparently wasn’t as current in the research as my second surgeon.

I was informed that labral repairs were previously thought to heal successfully in patients in their forties, but that more recent research shows the labrum doesn’t heal very well in patients much above 30.  For example, “A systematic review of surgery for SLAP tears included several studies that reported higher failure and complication rates in patients over age 40.”]

Because, of course, that couldn’t be enough, the MRI also showed that one of the tendons that comprise my rotator cuff is now torn also, as is one of my glenohumeral ligaments.

“See Doc, I told you it was broke!”

So now I’m headed for my fourth surgery to repair the damage done when I slipped and fell on that blasted wet floor.  Shoulder, wrist, elbow, and now, shoulder again.

It remains to be seen whether the rotator cuff tendon is torn enough to warrant repair, or whether it can be left alone to heal by itself.  If the surgeon needs to repair the rotator cuff while he’s in there, the recovery will be much longer and more painful.  [If the rotator cuff needs surgical repair, my projected recovery time doubles.]  So I’m hoping the rotator cuff damage isn’t too bad, and he can leave it alone.  The surgeon will probably leave the glenohumeral damage alone too.

It’s disillusioning when you discover that some damage just isn’t worth repairing – you’ll either heal or you won’t.

I know this sounds like maybe my current surgeon just doesn’t want to exert himself, and maybe I should be concerned for my welfare.  But I can reassure you (and myself) that this surgeon is one of the best.  I heavily vetted him before I let him operate on my wrist, and that surgery was phenomenally successful.  He also performed my elbow surgery, which had a successful outcome as well.

*Because* of our previous history, I am willing to trust him with my shoulder, even though what he is recommending sounds a bit counter-intuitive to me.  Even so, I am heavily researching his proposed surgical plan.  He knows that I do extensive research, and has suggested several relevant medical articles for me to review.

I am also aware that many orthopedic surgeons specialize in one area (knee, wrist, hip, shoulder, etc.).  Just because he is one of the best hand surgeons does not necessarily mean that he is a good shoulder surgeon as well.  He and I have discussed this, and I asked him how frequently he does shoulder surgeries, and what his success rate is.  I was satisfied with his answers, and I believe he will do as well with my shoulder as he has with my wrist and elbow.

So, I’m scheduled for shoulder surgery in about two weeks.

I’m really not looking forward to not being able to drive.  Or trying to wash myself with only one hand.  Not being able to open jars (and many other things).  Wearing pull-on pants, because I can’t fasten buttons.  Wearing slip-on shoes, because I can’t tie shoelaces.  Don’t EVEN get me started on how impossible it is to open the safety cap on prescription medicines with only one hand!  (Shouldn’t the pharmacy get notification that the prescription is for a patient who won’t be able to open the medicines if they flip the lid to “Safety”?)

But every time I go through this, it reminds me that my injuries could be worse.  That my disabilities could be worse.  I think a lot about wounded warriors when I am doing my rehabilitation.  My struggles will hopefully only be temporary.  Many wounded warriors live with their disabilities for the rest of their lives.

So many of the things we take for granted are a struggle for those who are incapacitated.  Health and able-bodiedness are the ultimate privilege.

Bottom Line:  I am scheduled for another surgery to repair my damaged arm.  My New Year’s Resolution of “No Surgeries in 2017” will be broken.  This will be my fourth surgery on this arm, and my second surgery on this shoulder.  I don’t know how many procedures the surgeon will need to perform during the surgery – I’m hoping only one.  I welcome whatever good will you’re inclined to send my way – hopefully the universe is listening.

I’m ready for the repairs to be complete and to be “airworthy” again.  I’m tired of living with the lingering damage from this ground looping incident.

WARNING: BEWARE SLIP AND FALL INJURIES!

Author: Crew Dog

Desert Storm era veteran. SAC trained warrior.

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